Learning to See

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30 Nov '11 Wed Nov 30, 2011 20:29    
chunky
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Post Learning to See

Click to follow Link to Original Article.

 
 
 
 
  
1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 14:14    
thoughton
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Post Re: Learning to See

Very nice story about your granddaughter Smile


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1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 15:42    
mannesty
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Post Re: Learning to See

Lovely story, and the image isn't too shabby either.

"Learning to see creatively" by Bryan Peterson is a good read.


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"Knowledge is knowing that a Tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is knowing not to use it in a fruit salad."

 
 
 
 
  
1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 18:45    
snappychappy
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Post Re: Learning to See

Great article.


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1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 20:40    
Charlotte
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Post Re: Learning to See

Lovely story. Cool

It would be helpful for new photographers if you could go into a bit more depth because although it's obvious when it's pointed out to you (if you're not a gifted / experienced photographer) it's not something that necessarily comes instinctively to most of us.

It wasn't until Dr.O pointed out to me that it's no good trying to get the camera to see what I see and I need to see what the camera sees that it dawned on me that the camera flattens things into 2 dimensional images so that the mushroom with the plant growing a foot behind it ends up looking as though the plant is growing out of the mushroom.

Eight months I'd been taking photos and it hadn't dawned on me until it was pointed out to me. Rolling Eyes

 
 
 
 
  
1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 20:59    
chunky
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Post Re: Learning to See

OK Charlotte I'll try and explain further.

Being able to recognise and see intrusions and spoilers (trees growing out of heads, elbows just sticking through into the edge of the frame etc etc.) is a fundamental skill that all photographers if they are going to progress will quickly master.
What I'm writing about is being able to see the small detail in the larger picture that will make it stand out from the banal and mundane. For example; presented with a view of a field of brightly coloured flowers a lot of photographers will try and capture the whole image, often this results in a nondescript mess. However the gifted photographer will take time studying the scene and looking at the more minute detail and may see a few rain or dew drops on one petal lit by a gentle light. He or she takes the image and captures a thing of beauty.

If you take a look at Jonathan Chritchley's work (he does have a website) you will see images where he has captured just a small part of the overall scene. In his larger vistas it is obvious that he has seen that element of the picture that will make it both unique and unequivocal. A few months ago in the magazine 'Outdoor Photographer' there was a picture of a red poppy in a field of other less colourful vegetation. The author skilfully used depth of field and precise focussing to isolate the poppy yet at the same time leave enough information in the picture to tell us what the whole image was about.
I hope I have explained things a wee bit better. I'm afraid I'm not much good at rhetorical explanations much preffering to demonstrate.

 
 
 
 
  
1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 21:24    
Charlotte
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Post Re: Learning to See

You've explained things perfectly - I had totally misunderstood what you meant by seeing.

Thank you,
Charlotte

 
 
 
 
  
1 Dec '11 Thu Dec 01, 2011 22:28    
marklj
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Post Re: Learning to See

A pal of mine introduced me to Jonathon Chritchleys work (he did one of his workshops in the South of France) and I have to say I think its as good as anything I've seen. Love it. Simplicity itself.

 
 
 
 
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